HOW THE PATRIOT FOREFATHERS USED COMMITTEES OF CORRESPONDENCE

 

 

The website https://www.bostonteapartyship.com/committees-of-correspondence has helpful information on how the patriot forefathers used Committees of Correspondence to achieve their political objectives:

 

 

“In Boston on Monday, November 2, 1772 … [patriots] … organized a town meeting … and garnered enough support to vote in a resolution to create a standing Committee of Correspondence. The purpose of the Boston Committee of Correspondence was to “Prepare a statement of the rights of the colonists, and of this province in particular, as men, as Christians, and as subjects; Prepare a declaration of the infringement of those rights; and Prepare a letter to be sent to all the towns of this province and to the world, giving the sense of this town.”  the majority of towns in Massachusetts took stock in the example set by the Boston Committee of Correspondence and established a network of Committees of Correspondence throughout the colony of Massachusetts…

 

Soon after the formation of the Boston Committee of Correspondence and the network of Committees of Correspondence which soon sprung up all over Massachusetts, in the spring of 1773 Committees of Correspondence were established in the colonies of Rhode Island, Conneticut, New Hampshire, and South Carolina. By February 1774, eleven of the Thirteen Colonies, excluding Pennsylvania and North Carolina, had established networks of Committees of Correspondence…

 

The primary function of the Committees of Correspondence was the championing and implementation of the Patriot cause through diplomatic means. The vast network of Committees of Correspondence served as a powerful pipeline through which information could be transmitted to all of the Thirteen Colonies. The Committees of Correspondence served as a well-calculated Patriot network for the dissemination of news and information as it related to grievances with Britain from the major cities to the rural communities. The Committees of Correspondence were responsible for ensuring the information they disseminated was accurate and reflected the views of their local parent governments on particular issues, the colonial interpretation of British policy, and that the information they issued was sent to the proper factions. Information was disseminated by the Committees of Correspondence throughout the Thirteen Colonies through pamphlets and letters carried by post riders or onboard ships…

 

The Committees of Correspondence could hardly claim to be the voice of the majority of colonists in the Thirteen Colonies, but their voice was the loudest and most broadcasted of all the factions. It was very easy to establish and form a local Committee of Correspondence. Any localized group of Patriots could form a committee and join the vast network of Committees of Correspondence and serve as the Patriot voice for their respective region. Roughly, 7,000 to 8,000 Patriots served as delegates at the local and colony level on the various Committees of Correspondence.”

 

 

American patriots today can similarly employ such a tool to help restore much of what has been progressively lost via the liberal agenda. An effort is underway to organize Committees of Correspondence in all 50 States of the USA. Anglo-American patriots should form these Committees of Correspondence with the eventual goal of calling a Continental Congress of Anglo-American patriots from the States of the USA, like the American patriot forefathers did:

 

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This Continental Congress can then establish the structure for a coming confederated Anglo-American nation under the Articles of Confederation. Our American patriot forefathers formed a nation under the Articles of Confederation with the Continental Colors (also called the Grand Union Flag) as its flag: